Newsletter

January 31, 2019
CAHFS has long-standing partnerships with the nation’s leading pork organizations, which each play a crucial role in ensuring global swine health and combating the industry's biggest threats.
Continue reading: Protecting swine health
January 31, 2019
Over the last 10,000 years or so, pigs and humans have developed a close relationship. Ever since pigs were first domesticated, swine production has played a key role in sustaining human populations.
Continue reading: "We didn’t start the fire"
January 31, 2019
Swine researcher Pedro Urriola's research includes a multitude of issues such as risk prevention, which focuses on stopping viruses such as African swine fever from infecting pigs through imported feed.
January 31, 2019
Cases of African Swine Fever have been reported throughout Africa, Europe, Russia, and China. Quick to respond, CAHFS created a multimedia toolkit called ASFWatch to educate producers about ASF and what they can do to prevent it from entering the United States.
Continue reading: Combating African swine fever
January 31, 2019
In partnership with the Swine Health Information Center and the U of M Swine Group, CAHFS has taken a novel approach to strengthening the United States market against global swine diseases.
October 4, 2018
Noelle Noyes uses her background in social sciences, business, and veterinary epidemiology to bridge the gap between researchers and farmers. “I'm very adamant about making sure my research has some connection to actual problems producers are facing."
October 4, 2018
Researchers at the University of Minnesota Center for Animal Health and Food Safety are working with the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the Minnesota Department of Health to learn which Salmonella strains are emerging in the Midwest.
Continue reading: Who’s infecting whom?
October 4, 2018
It’s important to understand how animals, humans, and the environment play a part in AMR genes. Through a partnership with the Minnesota Department of Health, CAHFS and the VDL are conducting new research.
October 4, 2018
For millennia, humankind has used antibiotics to treat infections empirically, even before knowing those infections were caused by bacteria—or that bacteria existed. Yet, as antimicrobials have flourished, so too has antimicrobial resistance in bacteria, leading to a prediction that by 2050 over 10 million people will die annually due to AMR.
October 4, 2018
Communities of scientists, practitioners, food producers, and health professionals around the globe are working to better understand the implications of antimicrobial use and resistance.

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